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Evaluating Maternal Social Support in Low Birth Weight Neonates Comparing With Normal Neonates in 2012

Soheila Riahinejad, Behrouz Farhangfar, Reza Kazemi, Marzieh Arabi

Introduction: Pregnancy as a stressful event may cause some consequence for both mother and infant such as low birth weight (LBW). LBW is seen in about 7% of pregnancies in Iran. It was proved there is a correlation between infants weight and maternal social support. This study was designed to evaluate maternal perceived social support in LBW infants and infants with normal weight.

Methods and Materials: This was a case-Control study which was done in Isfahan, Iran during April-November 2012 on 188 participants in 2 groups. In case group we had evaluated mothers with low birth weight infants and control group were mother with normal infants. Farsi version of Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS-P) was used for social support evaluation.

Results: In LBW group mean family support subscale score was 14.87 ± 4.33, Mean friends support subscale score was 9.65 ± 5.89 and significant others support subscale mean score was 15.18 ± 5.11. In normal weight  group mean family support subscale score was 18.46 ± 3.98, Mean friends support subscale score was 15.4 ± 6.41 and significant others support subscale mean score was 18.46 ± 4.1.

Conclusion: Maternal perceived prenatal social support could be a predictor for  infants birth weight. Supportive family could helps pregnant women to reduce adverse pregnancy out comes such as low birth weight.

Social support; Infant; Low Birth Weight

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